Cooking with my mother: Rye cake (bread)

Happy New Year!

Im so excited for this brand new year, and I´m kickstarting a new series called Cooking with my mother!

My beloved mother is such an amazingly warm, talented, beautiful, fun and wise woman that I´m lucky to count as a dear friend as well as my main mentor in life (dad is up there on that mentor list as well:)

She has this unique ability to turn any day into a good one, to turn three wilted ingredients in the fridge into a feast in no time, and even if she knows how to follow a recipe, she is quite the creative genius that has fun with food.

I have loved watching her cook, bake and bring our garden onto our plate since I was a little girl.

I wanted to find a way to preserve her recipes and learn more about food from her this last years, so I thought I´d share her with you and use this blog as a place to store some of the recipes passed from mother to daughter.

Many of the recipies she shares with me were passed down to her from her mother, and

I´m so excited to start collecting them here with you.

First one up is one of my favorite types of bread, rye cake bread.

I love the texture, flavor with anis and its shape.

Watching my beloved mother make this bread, that is called (rug kake) Rye cake in Norwegian, the other day, brought back so many wonderful childhood memories, and put that familiar warm bread perfume back in the kitchen.

It’s perfect warm with a bit of salted butter, and it is great for making delicious sandwiches with.

After a few days when the freshness has left it, toast it, and enjoy with a dash of butter and apricot marmalade.

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Ingredients

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11 dl all purpose flour

6 dl water

5 dl coarse rye flour

50 g yeast

2 tbs butter

2 tbs water

2 tbs salt

1 tbs anise

(don’t leave the anis out, it’s what really makes this bread)

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Directions

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Heat the water to luke warm, or test it on the back of your hand for the same temeprature as you.

Add butter and sirup to a bowl.

Add the yeast and mix till dissolved.

Add the dry to the wet and mix till it forms a medium firm dough.

Preheat oven to 200 degrees.

Cover the bread dough with a kitchen towel and set to rest and rise in a warm spot.

When the dough has risen to double its size, empty bowl onto a lightly floured surface.

Divide dough into four parts and roll them into balls.

Flatten them with your hands or a roller pin to the thickness of your hand flat on a table.

Cut a hole in the middle with a small lid or a knife.

For your own little personal touch use a small cookie cutter with a star or a heart.

Butter a baking tray and place the rye cakes.

Brush the cakes with warm water and with a fork dot the cakes.

Bake on 200 degrees for about 20 min.

Let them cool off on a rack and cover with a kitchen towel when room temperature.

Bon Appetit!

I wish you all a wonderful new year and thank you for your kind support throughout 2012.

Your thoughtful comments and feedback make it all worth it:)

Let’s start the new year with a dash of gratitude and a dose of adventure.

Sometimes is comes to us with ease and other times we need to dig deeper, but we can always find something to be grateful for and throw ourselves into the unknown with a bit of daredevilness;)

Happy New Year!

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2 Responses to Cooking with my mother: Rye cake (bread)

  1. debi says:

    Hello Marte~

    I would love to make this bread. Are the teaspoon and tablespoon measurements the same as ours in America? I don’t know what the dl measure is either, but I will try google.

    Thanks you,
    debi

  2. Marte Marie says:

    @debi You won’t be disappointed, this is such a delicious bread!Sinze I’m a bit unfamiliar with american measurements I found this site that does the tablespoon and tea spoon conversion well: http://www.asknumbers.com/TablespoonToTeaspoon.aspx As for the dl it stands for decilitre. Here is a site that converts dl to cups: http://www.convertunits.com/from/cup+%5BUS%5D/to/deciliter I hope this helps. Good luck baking:)